Tag Archives: social collaboration

To Tell The Truth…

My wife loves sharing the story of how she told her daughter, when she was a toddler, that a black spot would appear on her forehead any time she told a lie.  It wasn’t long before she would find herself facing a precocious four year-old, with one hand plastered across her brow, telling her that she did pick up her books and games, all while standing in the midst of a pile covering the playroom floor.

How to spot a liar (source: WSJ)

Too bad adults don’t have that easy a time discerning when people are being less than truthful in face-to-face situations, but there are still “tells” or other clues which are apparent enough to the trained observer.  However, what about when your only contact with another person is via email or social media?   How do you know then the difference between fact and fiction?  This article from today’s WSJ makes for some interesting reading, and shares some key insights:

“In the office and elsewhere, many relationships begin on email and remain that way for years. So it’s critical to have tools to help evaluate whether the person on the other end of a digital communication might be lying.”

“Research shows people tend to be suspicious of information they receive online but override their suspicions and trust the information anyway. Experts call this our ‘truth bias.'”

Full article can be found here.

Empowering Employees, via Social Collaboration

Social collaboration among colleagues, when embraced across all levels and functions, brings with it the opportunity to positively transform corporate culture, with the impacts being felt from boardroom to break room and everywhere in-between. That said, like any corporate initiative, this type of engagement requires leadership to overcome any institutional disconnects and truly “walk the walk”… not just “talk the talk.”  Via HR Bartender:

social media, infographic, employee, The Social Employee, engagement, corporate culture, McGraw Hill“Employees understand the power of social and expect it to be a part of their personal and professional lives. The infographic (click to enlarge) is based upon research in the book, “The Social Employee” by Cheryl Burgess and Mark Burgess. It offers best practices from companies like IBM, Dell, and Cisco on creating a social organizational culture.”

Read more of the original article here.

From Old School To Bold School

One of my friends in professional education just shared this on LinkedIn (scroll down for the source file and original blog post):

From Old School to Bold School, indeed.

For me, I think that this slide totally speaks to the new culture of social collaboration we are creating on a daily basis. One quote from the author’s post really seemed to hit the nail on the head at least for me:

“Too few schools are incubators of curious and creative learners given their cultures of standardization, fear, and tradition. No doubt, external pressures exist that drive that culture. But if there ever was a time to shift gears, this is it.”

Replace “schools” with “companies” or “organizations”, and think about it for a minute.  This is the kind of message we need to bring to the forefront when explaining what social collaboration is all about, and why it is not only relevant, but vital in this day and age.  It’s all too easy for organizations and companies to stick to their playbook of tried and true norms when engaging in the daily grind… but no organization will survive in this new economic reality if they let their own “external pressures” (and fears about change) rule their decision-making processes.

Principal Reflections | From Old School To Bold School.

Principal Reflections

9 Cs


A slide straight from Will Richardson’s  NHASCD workshop on  April 4, 2014

The ease of rhyme in Will Richardson’s workshop title (old to bold) doesn’t diminish the difficulty of Will’s challenge for all of us in education. In 2014, we are faced with pressures from many directions creating enormous inertia against doing the right thing. We live in a land of compromise where we have to be satisfied with partial wins. For example, Common Core is probably better than what we had for standards, but most of us aren’t crazy about the way it rolled out. And, isn’t it irritating how the educational behemoths are profiting from Common Core? We also know that poverty is still the greatest impediment in student achievement, but most of us feel powerless to influence the broken government to fix this. 

Will spoke last Friday as part of NHASCD’s workshop series in Concord, NH…

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Another infographic…

…but it’s a good one. Enterprise social networks are not just a passing fad; in many cases, they are helping to fill in the gaps common in today’s geographically and culturally diverse workplaces.

Read on:

10 good reasons to implement an Enterprise Social Network

Explore more visuals like this one on the web’s largest information design community – Visually.