To Tell The Truth…

My wife loves sharing the story of how she told her daughter, when she was a toddler, that a black spot would appear on her forehead any time she told a lie.  It wasn’t long before she would find herself facing a precocious four year-old, with one hand plastered across her brow, telling her that she did pick up her books and games, all while standing in the midst of a pile covering the playroom floor.

How to spot a liar (source: WSJ)

Too bad adults don’t have that easy a time discerning when people are being less than truthful in face-to-face situations, but there are still “tells” or other clues which are apparent enough to the trained observer.  However, what about when your only contact with another person is via email or social media?   How do you know then the difference between fact and fiction?  This article from today’s WSJ makes for some interesting reading, and shares some key insights:

“In the office and elsewhere, many relationships begin on email and remain that way for years. So it’s critical to have tools to help evaluate whether the person on the other end of a digital communication might be lying.”

“Research shows people tend to be suspicious of information they receive online but override their suspicions and trust the information anyway. Experts call this our ‘truth bias.'”

Full article can be found here.

Swag count

IMG_3928Just won one of these at the Momentum User Group booth.  While I am grateful for this grand prize, it’s going to be all the harder to convince the Boss that I really “need” that new Apple TV when it finally hits the market.

On a more serious note; I attended a great session on xCP this morning; check out this AM’s Momentum 2014 twitter feed for more information on some of the great features in the IIG portfolio.

On your way to EMCworld and Momentum 2014?

On your way to EMCworld and Momentum 2014? 

Recommend you check the attached article out, written by Virginia Backalitis at CMSwire. Great article, chock-full of her predictions for what we could see happen next week at the Sands Convention Center. My thoughts and comments down below, after the break. Will it all go down this way?  No one knows for sure, but either way it ought to be a fun show – JMM

Will Documentum and Syncplicity Hit the Jackpot at EMC World?

Continue reading On your way to EMCworld and Momentum 2014?

Dandelions and Lessons Learned

Robert D. Austin, Dean of the Faculty of Business at the University of New Brunswick, explains in this video how Danish software tester Specialisterne maintains a diverse and productive workforce. The “dandelion metaphor” he shares is a great way to explain the “lessons learned” in a context that can be easily understood.

Back in the late 90’s, Steve Jobs redefined Apple via “Think Different”:

In the documentary “One Last Thing” (2011) Jobs stated that people needed to “shake off this erroneous notion that life is there and you’re just gonna live in it, versus embrace it, change it, improve it, make your mark upon it…”

In my humble opinion, we need to make recognizing this a priority; “Being Different” no longer needs to be seen as an automatic impediment to succeeding in both life and career. Rather, we need to treat different perceptions as a positive value that, if anything, offers additional rewards and opportunities for all.

Empowering Employees, via Social Collaboration

Social collaboration among colleagues, when embraced across all levels and functions, brings with it the opportunity to positively transform corporate culture, with the impacts being felt from boardroom to break room and everywhere in-between. That said, like any corporate initiative, this type of engagement requires leadership to overcome any institutional disconnects and truly “walk the walk”… not just “talk the talk.”  Via HR Bartender:

social media, infographic, employee, The Social Employee, engagement, corporate culture, McGraw Hill“Employees understand the power of social and expect it to be a part of their personal and professional lives. The infographic (click to enlarge) is based upon research in the book, “The Social Employee” by Cheryl Burgess and Mark Burgess. It offers best practices from companies like IBM, Dell, and Cisco on creating a social organizational culture.”

Read more of the original article here.

Yeah, well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion, man.

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